However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm However, they are very different things: ORGANIC: Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment. Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.” Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org/www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body). FAIRTRADE: The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal. For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.” Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org/www.fairtrade.org For more on the similarities and differences go to: www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htmhttp://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm


ORGANIC and FAIRTRADE COTTON - What’s the difference?


It is easy to confuse the terms ‘Organic’ and ‘Fairtrade’. This isn’t helped by the fact that some crops – like coffee, tea and cotton – can be both Organic and Fairtrade.

However, they are very different things:

ORGANIC:

“Organic systems recognise that our health is directly connected to the food we eat and, ultimately, the health of the soil. Organic farmers aim to produce good food from a balanced living soil. Strict regulations define what they can and can't do. They place strong emphasis on protecting the environment.

Organic farmers use crop rotations to make the soil more fertile. For example, a farmer might graze sheep on a field one year, making the soil more fertile, then plant wheat the next and so on. They can't grow genetically modified crops and can only use - as a last resort - seven of the hundreds of pesticides available to farmers.”

Source: The Soil Association www.soilassociation.org (the UK's organic regulatory body).

FAIRTRADE:

“The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on products as an independent guarantee that disadvantaged producers in the developing world are getting a better deal.

For a product to display the FAIRTRADE Mark it must meet international Fairtrade standards. These standards are set by the international certification body Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO).

Producer organisations that supply Fairtrade products are inspected and certified by FLO. They receive a minimum price that covers the cost of sustainable production and an extra premium that is invested in social or economic development projects.”

Source: Fairtrade Foundation www.fairtrade.org

For more on the similarities and differences go to:

http://www.fairtrade.org.uk/about_organic.htm