In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport. EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 80 articulated buses that carry more than 263,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. For the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfFor the Shell Foundation, sustainable solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. The Foundation knows from experience that its work is much more likely to result in a sustainable solution if it gives More Than Money. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. In this case, it meant creating EMBARQ as the World Resource Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport – and as an intermediary organisation designed to act as a catalyst for change. It also meant the Shell Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included: Business DNA Even though EMBARQ is non-profit, we’ve worked with them to get the structure of a business. It has an internal board, it has a business plan and it is incentivised to achieve its targets. Business management techniques and expertise have also been adopted from the Shell Group. EMBARQ therefore gains knowledge from the Foundation and Group then transfers that knowledge to its partners. Partnerships Partnerships are at the heart of the EMBARQ model. It acts as a magnet drawing together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results. EMBARQ only gets involved if it can convince a city to go into partnership. Usually this involves the establishment of a local EMBARQ Centre for Sustainable Transport. It has a physical location and is staffed and run by locals. Another important element is the involvement of both the local private sector and the leveraging of international capital and interest from the multinational private sector. For example both BP and Ford are involved in our project in Istanbul. Market Oriented Ideas EMBARQ’s business model ensures it is market-oriented. Its business is to secure partnerships with cities and then help get interventions agreed. Cities are its clients, its target market, from a business point of view. It looks for city governments that are progressive and that are financially viable in terms of the international capital market. Then the focus is on coming up with a transport system that can pay for itself. The city can therefore go out and borrow money against this. The other dimension is getting companies to participate in helping those city partnerships to go forward, because of the commercial benefits. Money In 2002, we made an initial $3.5 million commitment over the first five years with a challenge element that, if EMBARQ raised the same amount, we would put in another $3.5 million, which we did. We have made the same commitment for the second five years of the programme. This incentive scheme lead EMBARQ to sign up other investors, for example the construction equipment giant Caterpillar has invested $7.5million. Shell Resources EMBARQ has benefited from Shell Group’s technical expertise on things like air quality, traffic management and fuel efficiency, as well as its links within the industry. It has learned a tremendous amount about project and risk management. We have also benefited from the political access the company’s in-country offices can get us, particularly in places like China and Turkey.We also now have another major corporate sponsor – Caterpillar. It is clear the Shell brand was key in bringing Caterpillar in. Source: 32. United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects: The 2003 Revision. New York: United Nations, p.3. Web site: http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/wup2003/WUP2003Report.pdfGreen Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route. Green Light for Green Bus Lanes A massive expansion of the Foundation-backed innovative bus system in Mexico City has been given the green light.It will see the existing Metrobus system - introduced with the Foundation’s help in 2005 and now carrying 263,000 passengers a day – extended from 20 to 220 kilometres as part of a new five-year partnership designed to ‘green’ Mexico City’s transport system.The World Resources Institute, EMBARQ – founded by Shell foundation in 2002 as WRI’s Center for Sustainable Transport - and CTS-Mexico (itself created by EMBARQ) will design and manage the expansion project.Metrobus functions like an above-ground subway in which large buses travel in dedicated lanes and stop at special stations. It already carries more than a quarter of a million passengers each day along Mexico City's Insurgentes Avenue, one of the longest and busiest streets in the world. The two-year old 'bus rapid transit' (BRT) system has also shortened commute times by up to an hour and reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.Commenting about the commitment by Mexico City Mayor Marcelo Ebrard to ‘green’ his city, WRI President Jonathan Lash said: 'Mayor Ebrard is proving that even the largest cities can successfully pursue sustainable development, simultaneously promoting economic growth, environmental protection, and public health in order to improve the lives of millions of residents.'Shell Foundation Director Kurt Hoffman, said: “This is great news. One of our key considerations when deciding to support a particular initiative is whether or not it can be “scaled-up” to maximise impact. This ten-fold expansion in Metrobus is proving it is possible to take sustainable transport projects to scale, helping the environment and Mexico City’s inhabitants.'Construction has already begun on an extension to the existing Metrobus line, as well as on a second route.
The Challenge


In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population—3 billion people—will be living in cities. Many of these sprawling urban expanses, especially in the developing world, are being brought to a standstill by traffic congestion and smog, which is also contributing to climate change. This disproportionately impacts the urban poor who are both affected by the pollution and separated form employment opportunities by inadequate public transport.





The Solution


EMBARQ was co-founded by the Shell Foundation in 2002 as the World Resources Institute’s Centre for Sustainable Transport. It acts as a catalyst for socially, financially, and environmentally sound solutions to the problems of urban mobility, mainly in developing world cities. In Mexico City, for example, it helped develop Metrobus – a 20-kilometres long bus corridor, serviced by 97 articulated buses that carry more than 315,000 people each day. Journey times and pollution have been significantly reduced. EMBARQ draws together government, business, civil society and transport experts to create public-private partnerships that deliver results.