More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming (see note 1 below). The challenge is to design stoves that emit less fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidize improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years. For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.For Shell Foundation, genuine solutions to poverty and environmental challenges are ones that are self-financing and can be easily replicated to maximise impact. In Breathing Space’s case it meant working with and sometimes actually creating intermediary organisations – from NGOs to for-profit companies, or in the case of its global partner, Envirofit, an NGO able to function like a business. This requires a ‘much more than money’ approach. The traditional charitable foundation model that sees cheques handed out to good causes simply isn’t enough. It also saw the Foundation applying ‘much more than money’ ingredients to achieve its objectives. These included:Partnerships Breathing Space has always relied on partners to help it deliver its objective of seeing a significant long-term reduction in IAP. For example, between 2002-7 it worked with existing IAP actors to trial nine different approaches to tackling IAP in seven countries. In late 2007, Envirofit became its new global partner, tasked with creating a business that will see 10 million improved stoves sold in five countries in five years.Money Between 2002-7, Shell Foundation committed more than $10million in seven countries, resulting in the sale of more than a quarter of a million stoves. Its global partnership with U.S. NGO Envirofit aims to achieve a five-year, $25 million investment – with funds from Shell Foundation being used to leverage much more from other sources.Shell Resources Throughout its involvement in IAP, Shell Foundation has used its links with the Shell Group to advance the Breathing Space programme’s objectives. For example Shell India, is helping Envirofit start-up its business in India, giving advise on recruitment, stakeholder engagement, HSSE (health, safety, security and environment) guidelines, local business practices and the manufacturing and distribution landscape.Market Oriented Ideas Early on in its involvement in IAP the Foundation realised that a problem as widespread as IAP could only be tackled through market-thinking (NGOs, governments or international organisations on their own were unlikely to make a significant difference). A market oriented approach is therefore at the heart of its solution working along the whole improved stove supply-chain – from research and development through to end-user – to see if a viable large scale stove industry can be created. Business DNA A good example of Breathing Space’s use of business-thinking and disciplines was the global market analysis it conducted for selling stoves. Working with Accenture Development Partnerships (ADP), it selected countries and states to target based on a range of market-impacting dynamics, including; wood fuel use, population size, average incomes, local sourcing and manufacturing capabilities and the impact past attempts to solve IAP by giving away stoves in some areas had on consumer attitudes.Fuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significantFuelling Change Shell Foundation has established an ambitious partnership that aims to cut the number of fume-related deaths caused by open fires in traditional homes More than three billion people, or almost half the world’s population, cook in their homes using traditional fires and stoves that use fuels such as wood, dung and crop waste. They spend much of their time indoors breathing in lethal fumes which, according to the World Health Organization, claim the lives of 1.5 million people a year, or one person every 20 seconds. Women and children make up the majority of these deaths due to their increased exposure in the home. The Shell Foundation and the US-based environmental non-profit organization Envirofit International hope to change that bleak picture. They’ve set up a partnership that has the potential to significantly reduce the number of global deaths caused by this form of ‘indoor air pollution’. The Foundation, is providing Envirofit – which specializes in green engineering – with $25million (£12.1m) of investment and organizational support to form a programme that should see 10 million clean-burning stoves sold in India, Latin America and East and West Africa over the next five years. Envirofit, working with Colorado State University’s Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory, will design, develop, market and distribute the ‘clean-cook’stoves, which emit significantly less toxic emissions and use less fuel. the only way we’re going to make a significant impact is to get private sector thinking involved Kurt Hoffman - Director, Shell Foundation Scientists at a private US firm, Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, will carry out detailed evaluation of the stoves once they are put into the field. And all parties have pledged to develop the programme with a keen eye on the real, rather than perceived, needs of their future customers. Shell Foundation initially got involved with the indoor air pollution issue in 2002, running nine pilots as part of its ‘Breathing Space’initiative in seven countries with various bodies, many of whom will be involved in the new push. One of the partners, Harish Hande, managing director of Selco India, an Indian social venture enterprise, says the programme is ‘a breath of fresh air’because it’s based on trying to provide something of real value to its target group, rather than handing a product down to them. The fact that the stoves will be sold – at prices ranging from $20– $150 (£10– £75) – is important. The partners believe the commercial, rather than aid-driven, model will provide a more sustainable way of tackling indoor air pollution – because it relies on market mechanisms to guide product development and drive consumer demand, instead of aid agencies donating or subsidizing the sale of stoves. The Foundation hopes that by treating people as customers rather than aid recipients, the stoves will be seen by householders as high-quality, aspirational products. ‘The only way we’re going to make a significant longterm impact and achieve the scale needed is to get private sector thinking involved,’argues Shell Foundation director Kurt Hoffman. It’s early days yet, but if the model proves to be as effective as Hoffman and his partners hope, then the return in human terms could be significant
The Challenge


More than half the world’s population uses open fires or traditional biomass-burning stoves to cook in their homes, according to the World Health Organisation. Fumes and smoke or Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) generated in this way causes more than 1.5 million premature deaths each year. More than half of those deaths are children under five. There is also growing evidence that this pollution contributes to global warming. The challenge is to design stoves that emit fewer fumes, use less fuel and meet the demands of users – and then find a sustainable way to get these improved stoves in to hundreds of millions of developing world homes.
The Solution


The Shell Foundation believes a problem as large as IAP can only be solved through market-thinking and private sector involvement. This represents a radical departure from most traditional methods, which have seen NGOs and governments give away or subsidise improved stoves. Breathing Space has signed a partnership with Envirofit International, a U.S. not-for-profit organisation to design and market a new range of improved stoves – and to find commercial partners to manufacture and distribute stoves. The aim is to see 10 million stoves sold in five countries in the next five years.